Namibia – Caprivi region biodiversity and fisheries management projects

Namibia – Caprivi region biodiversity and fisheries management projects

 

Funder: University of Namibia, NORAD, Namibia Nature Foundation, Nedbank GO-Green Fund

 

Various projects are being undertaken in the Caprivi Region of Namibia with the

 

 

Comparative biology of four cichlid species in the Okavango, Kwando and Chobe/Zambezi River systems to make recommendations for the best source of fingerlings for stocking.

 

Funder: Namibia Nature Foundation

 

The objective of this project is to provide information on how to increase yield from fish ranching by selecting the best source population of fish for stocking. This selection will be based on an assessment of the biology of four large cichlid fish species Oreochromis andersonii, Oreochromis macrochir, Tilapia rendalli and Serranochromis r. jallae in the Okavango, Kwando, Lake Liambezi and Zambezi/Chobe Rivers to address the following key questions:

(1) What is the growth rate of Oreochromis andersonii, Oreochromis macrochir, Tilapia rendalli and Serranochromis robustus in the Okavango, Kwando, Chobe and Zambezi River systems and which stock displays the best first year growth and largest size at age?

(2) At what size and age do the four species mature in the Okavango, Kwando, Chobe and Zambezi Rivers?

(3) Can S. robustus be stocked at a size such that it does not outgrow and potentially predate on cichlids stocked with it?

(4) What are the growth rates of these fish in stocked ponds and how does this differ from growth rates in the wild.

 

Towards a holistic management strategy for the fisheries of the Zambezi River and Eastern Caprivi Floodplains.

 

Funder: Nedbank GO-Green Fund

 

The research objectives are to undertake research into the dynamics of floodplain fisheries and particularly into the recolonisation of Lake Liambezi with fish in order to understand the dynamics of recolonisation and fish invasion processes in previously desiccated environments. The research results from this project will also develop the basis developing proactive response strategies to react to both natural (annual flood cycle fluctuations) and human-induced (fishing) changes in the fishery. This will provide information for best management practice in the floodplain fishery and allow for an assessment of the vulnerability of rural people to environmental change processes such as climate change.